Alcohol-free weekend kicks off awareness campaign on post

The Army Substance Abuse Program kicks off Alcohol Awareness Month with a challenge to not drink any alcohol April 2-4. Alcohol Awareness Month is recognized every April by the Army as well as nationally. The observance is an opportunity to educate the community and raise awareness. The goal is to encourage healthier relationships and boundaries with intoxicating beverages.

Fort Campbell’s Army Substance Abuse Program is kicking off Alcohol Awareness Month with a challenge to all – refuse even a drop of alcohol April 2-4.

“It may sound like a small thing to some, but it could be almost impossible for others,” said Staci Scarcello, ASAP specialist. “If someone comes to the realization that they can’t stop drinking for 72 hours, maybe they’ll get some help.”

Alcohol Awareness Month is recognized every April by the Army as well as nationally. The observance is an opportunity to educate the community and raise awareness. The goal is to encourage healthier relationships and boundaries with intoxicating beverages.

“We want to get to (Soldiers) before they have a problem so they don’t fall into a pattern and need treatment,” Scarcello said. “We want to talk about low-risk choices when it comes to drinking, showing them what that is, defining it.”

ASAP uses guidelines that range from 0-3 with a score of 1 for a single drink, 2 for two drinks daily, but no more than 3 in a one-day period, to help clients understand their intake and keep their usage within low-risk guidelines.

Scarcello said alcoholic beverages should be consumed on a full stomach, at least one hour apart and limited to two drinks per day, with no more than 14 in a week.

“If you are a person who actually drinks two drinks a day, every day, but you have a third drink on one of those days, you’re going to have to cut back on one of those other days, so that you are not exceeding that 14-drink a week limit, she said.

Scarcello said a standard drink contains .6 fluid ounces of pure alcohol, although that can look very different depending on the type of beverage and its alcohol content.

A 12-ounce beer that is 5% alcohol by volume or less, may have a very different impact than a pint of beer with a higher alcohol-content, wines with higher alcohol content or drinks made with more than one standard shot of liquor.

Fatal vision

To help people understand the impact of impairment, ASAP staff has several sets of goggles that simulate the effects of alcohol at different levels, both during the day and night.

Those goggles and several games will be set up at an ASAP booth 11 a.m.-1 p.m. April 12-16 at the Fort Campbell Exchange, 2840 Bastogne Ave., along with a table stocked with pamphlets, information on resources and ASAP specialists ready to answer questions. The goggles and games will be sanitized between uses and face masks must be worn inside in accordance with current COVID-19 safety procedures.

“We will have games that test our cognitive abilities while we are ‘impaired’ with our fatal vision goggles,” Scarcello said. “We’ll have them perform the tasks without the goggles, and time it, and then have them do that with the goggles. We’ll have our Operation game out there and ‘our walk-the-line mat.’”

Although the fun activities are meant to attract people to their table, alcohol abuse is very serious and something the ASAP staff want to highlight because prevention is vital, Scarcello said.

Banners will be on display at schools and there will be social media posts on topics related to alcohol awareness posted to the Fort Campbell ASAP Facebook page. Throughout the month, units, clinics, Blanchfield Army Community Hospital and the Fort Campbell Provost Marshal Office will participate in supporting activities.

For more information, call 270-798-4411.

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